Weber Shandwick to Provide Pro-Bono Support for the 10% Challenge

Thu, Sep 1 2011

Weber Shandwick is lending pro-bono support to one of the most concerning challenges facing future generations of Australians – sustainability and climate change. The agency will provide overall strategy, media and stakeholder relations support to The 10% Challenge – a program designed by Jon Dee, one of Australia’s most influential figures on environmental issues and founder of Do Something!. The Challenge has enlisted Australia’s top companies to reduce greenhouse emissions by 10% in the shortest possible timeframe – the impact of which will not only go some way to protect the sustainability of our environment, but also to improve the way companies operate.

“This is an issue about which we are all passionate and I am delighted to be partnering with Jon and his team in an effort to inspire Australians to share that passion,” said Ian Rumsby, Chairman, Weber Shandwick Australia. “We believe that the 10% Challenge will provide an opportunity for a stronger approach from the business community, as a whole. We’re committed to doing all we can to support the effort.”

With climate change and sustainability increasingly a part of the news agenda, Jon Dee has recognised the need to ensure the 10% Challenge receives as much awareness and support as possible, from both businesses and the general Australian public.

“Having worked with Weber Shandwick in the past, I am confident in their team as the ideal partner for this initiative,” said Dee. “The 10% Challenge is such an important step towards the betterment of our environment, and I know Weber Shandwick will ensure it receives the attention it deserves.”

Weber Shandwick will be supporting an announcement in the coming month regarding businesses that have signed up to the initiative.

For further media enquiries:
Pamela Klioufis
P +61 2 9994 4473
pklioufis@webershandwick.com

 

(originally posted on 1/09/2011)

Comments on this article

  • Sandy Posted at 19th Mar 12 2:02 PM

    Good thoughts Brian. On one hand I edonwr if it's widely known and accepted, the variety and capabilities of agencies here to local big clients. I've lived here for over a decade, but only recently have I realized how many agencies there are around. On the other hand I truly edonwr if local agencies have the talent and capabilities to handle larger clients with greater and more complex needs. From my dealings it seems that a lot of agencies here are a step behind the rest of the world in talent and experience they truly seem local in every sense of the word, where as shops in larger areas (Seattle, LA, New York) generally seem more up to speed with new trends, seem to be more connected with the world as a whole, and have talent and creative that far surpasses most of what can be found here in the valley. A lot of the work coming out of local shops isn't necessarily impressive. One of the biggest frustrations I see here consistently is agencies that continue to muck about in traditional media it seems like everyone else has come to terms with the fact that traditional media is no longer reaching the masses like it use to. That may not be the reason big clients are leaving , but that's just my observation. I feel like a lot of agencies here need to catch up with the rest, and especially start to attract clients that aren't just local, clients that are regional, national, global in scale, and then maybe the big players will notice them more. That's just my opinion.

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